Our Voice

Grandparents as Parents Survival Guide

Tips for Grandparents Who Are Primary Caregivers

By Michele Neuhaus, Director, 0-5 Early Childhood Mental Health Initiative

September 9 is Grandparents Day, one of those holidays that’s seen as cluttering up the calendar and a ploy by the greeting card industry. It shouldn’t be.

In my line of work, I see a lot of families in which, for a variety of reasons, parents are unable to care for their young children, and it’s the grandparents who step in to fill the role of primary caretaker. According to census figures, 2.7 million grandparents nationwide are raising grandchildren, up 7 percent from 2009. It’s the epitome of unconditional love they are showing for both their children and grandchildren; it’s a truly wonderful thing.

Wonderful, but not necessarily easy. Continue reading

The Real People Affected by the Ohio State Domestic Violence Scandal

By Yolanda Vega, LMSW
Associate Director, Elmhurst Family Center

At The Child Center of NY, our primary concern is always for the whole family — and how it affects the children’s overall well-being.

So when I hear about high-profile cases of domestic violence, my first thought is always how the situation affects the children: those directly involved (e.g., the abuser’s children) as well as those with no direct involvement but whose sense of the world is being formed by what they hear of it — especially from the people they love and trust.

It seems this was the last thing on the minds of anyone involved in the case of Ohio State University head football coach Urban Meyer Continue reading

On the Separation of Migrant Families at the Southern Border

By Traci Donnelly
Chief Executive Officer

A famous quote, often attributed to Mahatma Gandhi, states that a nation’s greatness is measured by how it treats its most vulnerable members. Children depend entirely on others and are therefore the most vulnerable among us. Living up to our responsibility to our children is our most sacred obligation. Continue reading

Stepping Up: Recognizing Men Who Show Up, in Places Where We Think They Aren’t

 

By Traci Donnelly
Chief Executive Officer

Manny Fiallo Jr.

Far Rockaway lost a giant of the community last year with the death of the incomparable Manny Fiallo Jr. Manny was a larger than life figure who, at the same time, managed to be relatable and approachable, and always had time for you — no matter who “you” were. In a neighborhood that’s seen more than its share of violence, less than its share of opportunity, and was on the verge of losing hope, Manny stood up to change things. He was dedicated to stopping the violence and embracing the potential in every kid. Manny never considered a child — or adult, for that matter — beyond hope, and he showed us he was right.

I’d say his passing left a void in the community, but perhaps the best thing we can say about a leader when he passes is that he leaves not a void, but a legacy. Continue reading

Spade and Bourdain Suicides Reflect How We Perceive Sadness—in Ourselves and Others

By Joseph Scotto, LCSW-R
Vice President, Behavioral Health

I once had a patient who survived the September 11th terrorist attack on the Twin Towers. He was the only one in his office who did. For four hours, his wife couldn’t get in touch with him and believed him to be dead. Both suffered from extreme depression afterward—but both were too ashamed to acknowledge it. How could they be depressed when he, unlike so many they knew, came home? People around them were quick to tell them how they should feel: “You are so lucky,” people would say after hearing of their harrowing experience. Not: “I’m so sorry you went through this.”

I thought of that man and his wife when I heard about the suicide of Kate Spade and then, just a few days later, of Anthony Bourdain. Continue reading

Love, Inside and Out

By Tina Reynolds, MSW
Project Director, A Vision for Tele-Visiting

When we picture families paying tribute to Mom on Mother’s Day, we don’t tend to envision the celebration in a prison. But that scenario is a reality for many American children, and an out-of-reach dream for others. Continue reading

This Women’s History Month, Time’s Up on More than You Think

The author’s grandmother, Eleanor, who grew up without a mom present — and was the author’s biggest influence.

By Traci Donnelly
Chief Executive Officer

Women’s History Month is one of those observances that everyone knows about every year, but few people take notice. While that should never be the case, it is especially important that this is not one of those years. Continue reading

Reversing Troublesome Trends

By Deep Ghosh
Senior Vice President, External Affairs and Community Engagement

Partners for District 27. Clockwise from back left: Deep Ghosh; Community Affairs PO Kevin Campbell; Commanding Officer of the 101st Precinct in Far Rockaway, Vincent Tavalaro; and Brandon Jeffries.

The Child Center of NY is on a path of self-assessment, taking a serious look at our customers, where and how many there are, how we are doing in delivering services, and most important: Are we making a measurable impact?

Continue reading

Join The Rockaways Community for a Peace March and Summit on February 24

Because Enough Is Enough

The whole nation, it seems, has been in mourning these past few weeks due to gun violence. Here in our own community of the Rockaways, the heartbreak has been intensely personal, as we have lost two 15-year-old boys, Trevor Rhudd and Youssef Soliman, in the past two months to senseless gun violence.

Parents, young people, and community members of all ages are coming together to say enough is enough. Continue reading

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